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The Serpent of Venice

A Novel
Moore, Christopher (Book - 2014)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Serpent of Venice
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"Venice, a long time ago. Three prominent Venetians await their most loathsome and foul dinner guest, the erstwhile envoy from the Queen of Britain: the rascal-Fool Pocket.This trio of cunning plotters--the merchant, Antonio; the senator, Montressor Brabantio; and the naval officer, Iago--have lured Pocket to a dark dungeon, promising him an evening of spirits and debauchery with a rare Amontillado sherry and Brabantio's beautiful daughter, Portia. But their invitation is, of course, bogus. The wine is drugged and the girl is not even within the city limits. Desperate to rid themselves once and for all of the man who has consistently foiled their grand quest for power and wealth, they have lured him to his death. (How can such a small man, be such a huge obstacle?). But this Fool is no fool and he has more than a few tricks (and hand gestures) up his sleeve. Greed, revenge, deception, lust, and a giant (but lovable) sea monster combine to create another hilarious and bawdy tale from modern comic genius, Christopher Moore"-- "William Shakespeare meets Edgar Allan Poe in New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore's THE SERPENT OF VENICE! Oh, yeah, and everyone's favorite fool, Pocket of Dog Snogging, is back, too"--
Authors: Moore, Christopher, 1957-
Title: The serpent of Venice
a novel
Publisher: New York, NY :, William Morrow,, 2014.
Edition: First Edition.
Characteristics: 326 pages :,map ;,24 cm
Content Type: text
Media Type: unmediated
Carrier Type: volume
Summary: "Venice, a long time ago. Three prominent Venetians await their most loathsome and foul dinner guest, the erstwhile envoy from the Queen of Britain: the rascal-Fool Pocket.This trio of cunning plotters--the merchant, Antonio; the senator, Montressor Brabantio; and the naval officer, Iago--have lured Pocket to a dark dungeon, promising him an evening of spirits and debauchery with a rare Amontillado sherry and Brabantio's beautiful daughter, Portia. But their invitation is, of course, bogus. The wine is drugged and the girl is not even within the city limits. Desperate to rid themselves once and for all of the man who has consistently foiled their grand quest for power and wealth, they have lured him to his death. (How can such a small man, be such a huge obstacle?). But this Fool is no fool and he has more than a few tricks (and hand gestures) up his sleeve. Greed, revenge, deception, lust, and a giant (but lovable) sea monster combine to create another hilarious and bawdy tale from modern comic genius, Christopher Moore"--
"William Shakespeare meets Edgar Allan Poe in New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore's THE SERPENT OF VENICE! Oh, yeah, and everyone's favorite fool, Pocket of Dog Snogging, is back, too"--
Local Note: 1 6 8 15 16 17 18 27 29 35 37 53 61 62 68 69 71 74 75 79 97 109 112 118 127 133 138 148 150 152 153 159 160 167 172 175 182 193 198 203 210 211 216 222 224 226 228 231 233 234 235 236 242 243 244 245 250 258 262 263 264 274 276
ISBN: 9780061779763
0061779768
Statement of Responsibility: Christopher Moore
Subject Headings: Merchants Italy Venice Fiction. Legislators Italy Venice Fiction. Navies Italy Venice Officers Fiction. Avarice Fiction. Revenge Fiction. Deception Fiction. Attempted murder Fiction. Venice (Italy) Foreign relations 1508-1797 Fiction.
Genre/Form: Humorous fiction.
Historical fiction.
Gothic fiction.
Humorous stories.
Topical Term: Merchants
Legislators
Navies
Avarice
Revenge
Deception
Attempted murder
LCCN: 2014002826
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Aug 24, 2014
  • deRougemont rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Change your relationship with Shakespeare forever. Read this book. You will laugh from the first page to the last.

Aug 17, 2014
  • millerfamily4 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Absolutely excellent. This and Fool are some of Moore's top writes!

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

reviewed in the Stratford Gazette, may 2014 (see summary)

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

reviewed in the Stratford Gazette, May 2014

May 18, 2014
  • bheat4141 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Didn't enjoy it as much as Fool, but still an enjoyable read. Plot was a bit scattered as Moore can be but you should know what you are getting with him by now.

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May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

DanniOcean thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Author Christopher Moore could not have timed it better - just in time for the Stratford Festival season’s opening, his latest novel The Serpent of Venice mashes up three (or more) of Shakespeare’s most famous and gut-wrenching tragedies – into a most gut-busting hilarious chain of events. It takes a person with a great deal of hutzpah to take Othello, The Merchant of Venice and King Lear, puree them into one (fairly) believable story, make them funny, and give them all much happier endings (the villains come to some very sticky ends). But not only does Moore meld the plots, he also throws in elements from Edgar Allan Poe and not a small smattering of history in the Travels of Marco Polo. Plus there’s a wandering chorus, an amorous and homesick dragon, and a ghost - as Pocket, the title character would say, “There’s always a bloody ghost.” Now, to get the full picture, readers unfamiliar with Moore’s work may want to begin with the first novel to feature Pocket the jester, called Fool – which parodies King Lear in full (there’s a ghost in that one, too). However The Serpent of Venice is a romp for any Shakespeare fan who does not mind Moore’s habitual irreverence for his source material; in that way, he is somewhat like the Bard himself. That is not to say Moore did not do his homework – according to the author notes he was quite careful in his research and used historical events to bind the various plots together. In fact, his attention to detail makes his novels more than just cheeky fluff. However, the details to which he pays attention are those that lie between the lines, the details that may be overlooked in a casual reading of history and the Bard, the details that may make those readers of Shakespeare sit up and go, “well, THAT’S interesting…” By the way, Moore can out-bawdy the Bard, so be prepared for some truly lewd wordplay and inventive uses of the f-bomb. I would dearly love Moore’s novel adapted for the stage, but until an enterprising playwright decides to take that on, we can enjoy the narration of Euan Morton on the audiobook version as well. The Serpent of Venice currently sits at the top of my favourite books list of 2014. Enjoy!

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Author Christopher Moore could not have timed it better - just in time for the Stratford Festival season’s opening, his latest novel The Serpent of Venice mashes up three (or more) of Shakespeare’s most famous and gut-wrenching tragedies – into a most gut-busting hilarious chain of events. It takes a person with a great deal of hutzpah to take Othello, The Merchant of Venice and King Lear, puree them into one (fairly) believable story, make them funny, and give them all much happier endings (the villains come to some very sticky ends). But not only does Moore meld the plots, he also throws in elements from Edgar Allan Poe and not a small smattering of history in the Travels of Marco Polo. Plus there’s a wandering chorus, an amorous and homesick dragon, and a ghost - as Pocket, the title character would say, “There’s always a bloody ghost.” Now, to get the full picture, readers unfamiliar with Moore’s work may want to begin with the first novel to feature Pocket the jester, called Fool – which parodies King Lear in full (there’s a ghost in that one, too). However The Serpent of Venice is a romp for any Shakespeare fan who does not mind Moore’s habitual irreverence for his source material; in that way, he is somewhat like the Bard himself. That is not to say Moore did not do his homework – according to the author notes he was quite careful in his research and used historical events to bind the various plots together. In fact, his attention to detail makes his novels more than just cheeky fluff. However, the details to which he pays attention are those that lie between the lines, the details that may be overlooked in a casual reading of history and the Bard, the details that may make those readers of Shakespeare sit up and go, “well, THAT’S interesting…” By the way, Moore can out-bawdy the Bard, so be prepared for some truly lewd wordplay and inventive uses of the f-bomb. I would dearly love Moore’s novel adapted for the stage, but until an enterprising playwright decides to take that on, we can enjoy the narration of Euan Morton on the audiobook version as well. The Serpent of Venice currently sits at the top of my favourite books list of 2014. Enjoy!

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May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: quite bawdy

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: much inventive cussing - hilarious, but could be offensive to some

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: quite bawdy

May 20, 2014
  • DanniOcean rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: very inventive cussing

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app02 Version Borgsjo Last updated 2014/10/29 13:43