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Fresh Off the Boat

A Memoir
Huang, Eddie (Book - 2013 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Fresh Off the Boat


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"Long before I met him, I was a fan of his writing, and his merciless wit. He's bigger than food."--Anthony Bourdain NATIONAL BESTSELLER *nbsp;NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY KIRKUS REVIEWS Eddie Huang is the thirty-year-old proprietor of Baohaus--the hot East Village hangout where foodies, stoners, and students come to stuff their faces with delicious Taiwanese street food late into the night--and one of the food world's brightest and most controversial young stars. But before he created the perfect home for himself in a small patch of downtown New York, Eddie wandered the American wilderness looking for a place to call his own. nbsp; Eddie grew up in theme-park America, on a could-be-anywhere cul-de-sac in suburban Orlando, raised by a wild family of FOB ("fresh off the boat") hustlers and hysterics from Taiwan. While his father improbably launched a series of successful seafood and steak restaurants, Eddie burned his way through American culture, defying every "model minority" stereotype along the way. He obsessed over football, fought the all-American boys who called him a chink, partied like a gremlin, sold drugs with his crew, and idolized Tupac. His anchor through it all was food--from making Southern ribs with the Haitian cooks in his dad's restaurant to preparing traditional meals in his mother's kitchen to haunting the midnight markets of Taipei when he was shipped off to the homeland. After misadventures as an unlikely lawyer, street fashion renegade, and stand-up comic, Eddie finally threw everything he loved--past and present, family and food--into his own restaurant, bringing together a legacy stretching back to China and the shards of global culture he'd melded into his own identity. Funny, raw, and moving, and told in an irrepressibly alive and original voice, Fresh Off the Boat recasts the immigrant's story for the twenty-first century. It's a story of food, family, and the forging of a new notion of what it means to be American. Praise for Fresh Off the Boat nbsp; "Brash and funny . . . outrageous, courageous, moving, ironic and true." -- New York Times Book Review nbsp; "Bawdy and frequently hilarious . . . a surprisingly sophisticated memoir about race and assimilation in America . . . as much James Baldwin and Jay-Z as Amy Tan . . . rowdy [and] vital . . . It's a book about fitting in by not fitting in at all." --Dwight Garner, The New York Times nbsp; "Uproariously funny . . . emotionally honest." -- Chicago Tribune nbsp; "Huang is a fearless raconteur. [His] writing is at once hilarious and provocative; his incisive wit pulls through like a perfect plate of dan dan noodles." -- Interview nbsp; "Although writing a memoir is an audacious act for a thirty-year-old, it is not nearly as audacious as some of the things Huang did and survived even earlier. . . . Whatever he ends up doing, you can be sure it won't look or sound like anything that's come before. A single, kinetic passage from Fresh Off the Boat . . . is all you need to get that straight." --Bookforum
Authors: Huang, Eddie, 1982-
Title: Fresh off the boat
a memoir
Publisher: New York :, Spiegel & Grau,, c2013.
Edition: 1st ed.
Characteristics: 276 p. ;,25 cm.
Local Note: 6 53 54 71 74 76 79 80 118 133 138 148 173 216 242 243 244 258
ISBN: 0679644881
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Report This Jan 16, 2014
  • DellaV rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This is an interesting story about a young man whose parents came from China, and became, through hard work, successful restaurant owners. Their son, though, is another story. He gets into nothing but trouble in school, feeling disenfranchised by The American Dream even though his parents are living proof of that dream, and he benefitted from it at all times. He goes through many tribulations of his own devices; graduates from law school only to become, like his father, a restaurant owner. His love of food is apparent; his love of minor criminal activity is also. What undoes him is his love of street slang (which is inappropriately funny; many of us have met that person from another language who has picked up so much American slang that they become almost completely impossible to understand, and this guy is him!) He is really focused on being COOL, which is hilarious in anyone over 18, and he is still carrying this banner into his 30's! The way this story is written will make it a classic many years from now, as an archaic example of early 2000's slang, which, I suppose, makes this book worth reading?

Report This Jun 29, 2013
  • emkeller rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I really enjoyed reading about Huang's experiences as an Asian American, his critical comments about racism, his voice, which ranges from academic to street. I was hoping for more of a food memoir than a coming-of-age memoir, but it was still a fun ride.

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Report This Jan 16, 2014
  • DellaV rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

DellaV thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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