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Reality Is Broken

Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World
McGonigal, Jane (Book - 2011 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Reality Is Broken
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Visionary game designer Jane McGonigal shows how we can harness the power of computer games to solve real-world problems and boost global happiness, since her research suggests that gamers are expert problem solvers and collaborators because they regularly cooperate with other players to overcome daunting virtual challenges.
Authors: McGonigal, Jane
Title: Reality is broken
why games make us better and how they can change the world
Publisher: New York : Penguin Press, 2011.
Characteristics: 388 p. :,ill. ;,25 cm.
Contents: Why games make us happy
Reinventing reality
How very big games can change the world.
Summary: Visionary game designer Jane McGonigal shows how we can harness the power of computer games to solve real-world problems and boost global happiness, since her research suggests that gamers are expert problem solvers and collaborators because they regularly cooperate with other players to overcome daunting virtual challenges.
Local Note: 6 15 18 29 53 109 112 118 133 143 148 167 172 173 188 193 203 210 211 216 224 226 231 242 244
ISBN: 9781594202858
1594202850
9780143120612
Statement of Responsibility: Jane McGonigal
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. [364]-378) and index.
Subject Headings: Computer games Social aspects.
Topical Term: Computer games
LCCN: 2010029619
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McGonigal should try attending one of those gamer conventionsl?

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I found this book slow going and repetitive, although it does make some good points.

Sep 17, 2013
  • oldhag rated this: 1.5 stars out of 5.

An unrealistic, and slightly sinister, vision of a future where video gamers are contributing free labor under the guise of playing a game. For example, McGonigal suggests that gamers should help find a cure for cancer by doing crowdsourcing on their playstation 3s in exchange for intrinsic rewards and/or for "micropayments" (maybe) since organizations can't afford to pay anyone to do the time-intensive work. Apparently, McGonigal is unaware that in a capitalist society one has a right to expect to be rewarded, and handsomely, for such an effort. Or maybe she is aware but thinks that exploitation is a great game to play as long as you're not the one being exploited.
MCGonigal suggests some distasteful, disrespectful, entertainment games, and no where does she make allowance for people who don't want to play games, people who, in fact, think that reality is both more fun and more serious than any computer game.

Jul 11, 2012
  • olive_camel_7 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I found this book stimulating and inspiring. We can expect to see more games and game-like systems in our future. I'm glad that the author wants to use games to make life better. I'm especially impressed with SuperBetter.com and games to promote dialog about world problems.

Reader oldhag's comments puzzle me because she sounds as if she has never heard of America's tradition of volunteerism. She may not like games, but maybe she would enjoy volunteering for something she believes in.

Jun 12, 2012
  • boyarsky rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

It's not often that a non-fiction book is a page turner, but this one was. I enjoyed reading all the examples. Both of games and of how to gamify life. I was surprised at the useful games like worldwithoutoil.org.

There are a lot of footnotes/references to read more online - which I did.

I liked the reference to Outlier's 10K hours of practice. Students graduating now have 10K hours of collaboration. I learned about NYC Quest to Learn - a charter school using game mechanics/language for learning.

When I read about flow/fiero, I immediately thought about being in the zone when coding.

A great book!

One of the clearest examples of what McGonigal is talking about is Chorewars, an online game that turns household chores into 'quests'.

Chorewars is an extremely rudimentary videogame, but it's a sign of things to come, and an example that knee-jerk sceptics are likely to appreciate.

Mar 01, 2011
  • damnmagpie rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A book for gamers, and the parents of gamers, and the teachers of gamers, and the bosses and managers of gamers, and the family of gamers, which is everyone.

McGonigal asserts that video games make us more social, better at collaborating and happier. Really?

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Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Games have been a fundamental part of human civilization for thousands of years.

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Learning to stay urgently optimistic in the face of failure is an important emotional strength that we can learn in games and apply in our real lives. When we’re energized by failure, we develop emotional stamina. And emotional stamina makes is possible for us to hang in longer, to do much harder work, and to tackle more complex challenges. We need this kind of optimism in order to thrive as human beings.

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

It may once have been true that computer games encouraged us to interact more with machines than with each other. But if you still think of gamers as loners, then you’re not playing games.

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

games are teaching us to see what really makes us happy – and how to become the best versions of ourselves.

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Then ten/two rule means you work for ten minutes, and then let yourself do something fun and unproductive for two minutes – checking e-mail, getting a snack, browsing headlines. The theory is that it’s easy to commit your attention to work for just ten minutes at a time, and as a result you’ll get fifty good working minutes out of every hour. For many people, that’s a huge boost in productivity.

Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

good games don’t just happen. Gamers work to make them happen. Any time you play a game with someone else, unless you’re just trying to spoil the experience, you are actively engaged in highly coordinated, _prosocial_ behavior. No one forces gamers to play by the rules, to concentrate deeply, to try their best, to stay in the game, or to act as if they care about the outcome. They do it voluntarily, for the mutual benefit of everyone playing, because it makes a better game.

Mar 01, 2011
  • damnmagpie rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

My rant is about the fact that reality is fundamentally broken, and we have a responsibility as game designers to fix it, with better algorithms and better missions and better feedback and better stories and better community and everything else we know how to make. We have a responsibility as the smartest people in the world, the people who understand how to make systems that make people feel engaged, successful, happy, and completely alive, and we have the knowledge and the power to invent systems that make reality work better.

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Sep 18, 2013
  • andreareads rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal

Jane McGonigal speaking at TED

Author McGonigal speaking at the 2010 TED conference. (Technology Entertainment Design), an annual multidisciplinary conference.

Find it at CLEVNET

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/21 13:32