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Winesburg, Ohio

Anderson, Sherwood (Book - 2008)
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Winesburg, Ohio
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... there is within every human being a deep well of thinking over which a heavy iron lid is kept clamped. Winesburg, Ohio (1919) is Sherwood Anderson's masterpiece, a cycle of short stories concerning life in a small Ohio town at the end of the nineteenth century. At the centre is George Willard, a young reporter who becomes the confidant of the town's `grotesques' - solitary figures unable to communicate with others. George is their conduit for expression and solace from loneliness, but he has his own longings which eventually draw him away from home to seek a career in the city. He carries with him the dreams and unuttered words of remarkable characters such as Wing Biddlebaum, the disgraced former teacher, and the story-telling Doctor Parcival. The book has influenced many American writers, including ernest hemingway, William Faulkner, John Updike, Raymond Carver, and Joyce Carol Oates. It reshaped the development of the modern short story, turning the genre awayfrom an emphasis upon plot towards a capability for illuminating the emotional lives of ordinary people. This new edition corrects errors in earlier editions and takes into account major criticism and textual scholarship of the last several decades.
Authors: Anderson, Sherwood, 1876-1941
Title: Winesburg, Ohio
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
Characteristics: xxxiii, 204 p. ;,19 cm.
Local Note: 148 149 216
Additional Contributors: Love, Glen A. 1932-
ISBN: 9780199540723
0199540721
Statement of Responsibility: Sherwood Anderson ; edited with an introduction by Glen A. Love
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. [xxix]-xxx).
Subject Headings: Ohio Social life and customs Fiction. City and town life Ohio Fiction. Anderson, Sherwood, 1876-1941. Winesburg, Ohio.
Genre/Form: Domestic fiction.
Topical Term: City and town life
LCCN: 2008275178
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NYPL Staff Pick
Quite possibly the original novel of stories work, Sherwood Anderson's novel debuted over 100 years ago. Each solitary character gets a chapter; the chapters in turn are lightly woven together around a shared small town and a visiting reporter. I read this book in high school and think about often many years later.
- Lynn Lobash, Readers Services

Rather than an idyllic portrayal of american small town life, these connected stories are about psychological isolation, loneliness, and frustration brought about by small town mores. Anderson possesses brilliant insight into humor thought and emotion and expresses his vision with beautiful prose.

Sep 03, 2013
  • sharonb122 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

At first I did not understand why this was such a classic, but I did understand many of the things after I read the commentary. Finally, I simply saw much humor in the stories. Which person was crazier! In the chapter, "Queer," when Elmer finished talking to Mook, Mook went to tell someone that Elmer was crazy, but he was telling his cows. Glad I read this.

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app09 Version Arkelstorp Last updated 2014/10/23 09:41