[]
[]

The Brain That Changes Itself

Stories of Personal Triumph From the Frontiers of Brain Science

Doidge, Norman

(Book - 2007)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Brain That Changes Itself
Print
An astonishing new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable. Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, Norman Doidge, M.D., traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity and the people whose lives they've transformed-people whose mental limitations or brain damage were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these marvelous stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an immensely moving, inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential.
Publisher: New York : Viking, 2007.
ISBN: 9780670038305
Characteristics: xvi, 427 p. ;,24 cm.

Opinion

Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Oct 10, 2014
  • KCLSRecommends rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

The brain really CAN change: It is a plastic, living organ that can actually change its own structure and function, even into old age. This revolutionary discovery, called neuroplasticity, promises to overthrow the centuries-old notion that the brain is fixed and unchanging.

Oct 29, 2013
  • Coty William Thompson rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Interesting introduction to a topic that is still considered fringy by some. Turns some long cherished beliefs about the limits of neural development and recovery after illness or injury on their head. New neurons do indeed form, though not in quite the same number and manner as in embryonic development. Existing neurons can indeed heal and re-wire themselves, though perhaps not quite as good as new. The science is in. Lots of questions remain of course, but that's science for you.

The book is a bit tiresome in the hero-worship and description of trials and tribulations of researchers, clinicians and those who have had "miraculous" recoveries. Adulation aside though, it brings alive some otherwise rather dry research findings and makes you wonder what might be the next big discovery.

HUGE references section for those who might want to base a term paper on this book. Almost as easy as Google. If you do, make sure to credit your sources . . .

Sep 29, 2013
  • chickadee47 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Well-written and fascinating. My favorite combination :)

I find this book incredibly inspiring.

Doidge is engaging, interesting, and very human - the subject matter may be scientific, but this is definitely not a dry read. In each chapter, Doidge weaves a story that colorfully illustrates the potential of the human brain to heal and improve itself.

Hooray for an author who looks past out-dated scientific dogma and really looks at what the brain can do - which is a lot.

This is honestly one of my favorite books of all time. Besides recommending it to nearly every friend and family member, I have even recommended it to strangers I've met on the bus - the book is just that memorable. :-)

Aug 24, 2012
  • browncnd99 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Accessible book on brain plasticity; interesting stories. Some of the animal testing is disturbing but the information gained was fascinating. Fed my need for science-nerd content! I have some limited experience with FastForWord so I do wonder about the studies/reliability/validity etc. That being said, the individual case studies made for a good read.

May 26, 2012
  • slottino rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Be prepared to read about animal testing.

Apr 14, 2012
  • kgillo rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Interesting.

Hurray for neuroplasticity! This book is a fascinating read and changed how i view reality

Feb 22, 2012
  • CSchmidt1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A well written book chronicling the work of a variety of researchers, therapists, and individuals to uncover the many ways our brains learn, grow, and adapt. The book features various individuals and how they benefited from diverse treatments and therapies. A hopeful book that shows that in cases where there was once no hope, people are now finding effective treatments. Comprehensive notes establish credibility.

Jan 05, 2012
  • peter_pekala rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Excellent book! Every person of any age or education level would pick this book off the shelf to embrace learning about his/her own brain. Of course there is some science, but overall the book is simple, written to be understood by YOU. Learned a lot on how to preserve healthy brain for life or forge bad habits. Recommend!

View All Comments

Quotes

Add a Quote

Nov 04, 2009
  • dotdotdot rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

While we have yet to understand exactly how thoughts actually change brain structure, it is now clear that they do, and the firm line that Descartes drew between mind and brain is increasingly a dotted line.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Find it at CLEVNET

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.
app04 Version gurli Last updated 2014/12/09 10:52